Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum

Being comparatively small in size, the existence of the ocean in the surrounding area that makes a natural barrier against the diffusion of the Indogenic trends outwards and the development of an indigenous essence of natural and cultural content that invariably results by the previous two traits reveals a number of identical characteristics inherited in the island civilizations.

Identifying such characteristics as the most essential ingredients to keep history alive in the presence of future is a task that fulfills a global responsibility.

Located inside the old Dutch Warehouse Building within the gateway entrance to the court complex in the city of Galle in southern Sri Lanka where time stands still making appealing invitations for the lovers of history from many nooks and corners of the globe is the Maritime Archaeology Museum and Visitor Information Centre.

During your visit to the down-south destination of Galle in your next visit to beautiful Sri Lanka, the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum is a must see place, you would never forget to be.

Name plaque at the entrance to the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections from ship wrecks near the Port of Galle displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic coins found from sheip wrecks near the Port of Galle displayed at the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections from ship wrecks near the Port of Galle displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
An ancient ceramic vessel among historic collections displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
A bottle cluster found in a bottle wreck. This bottle wreck kept at the museum for exhibition was found close to the Light House in Great Basses off Southern Coast. I was from a British Ship that sunk nearly in the middle of the 19th century. The name ‘Bottle Wreck’ is derived from the abundance of bottles at the site. The name of the bottle manufacture company inscribed on these bottles is SUPERIOR SODA WATER CLARKE ROMER & CO. CEYLON (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
This wooden image of Lord Buddha was found after it was washed off to the eastern shore during the Tsunami in 2004. The right hand of the image depicts the ‘Abhaya Mudra.’ The rest of the image including the upper part, left hand and lower part are badly damaged. The arrangements of the fleet of the robe of the image suggest that it could be a production of Indonesia or Myanmar. (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Another image of Lord Buddha kept at the museum. It was also recovered from the eastern coast after the 2004 Tsunami devastation. It is depictred as seated on a ‘Padmasana’ (Lotus Seat) in ‘Veeraasana’ posture. The long head and the prominent protuberance and the rainbow type eye brow suggests the stylistic characteristics of the ‘Sukhotas Tradition’ (14-15 centuries) of Thailand. (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
A 19th century couple. The attire of the 19th century elites in Sri Lanka reflects Europian inspiration that prevailed for nearly 200 years. Contemporary style of the elite’s costume was an admixture of three principle traditions namely the Portuguese, Dutch and British with a mixture of the prevailing South Indian styles. ‘Kabaakuruththuwa’ and ‘Osariya’ were prominent features of the female attire of the elite class of the period. (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
a model of the southern weaver woman displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
This bronze bell belongs to the Dutch ship ‘Hercules’ which sank in the Galle Harbour on 22nd May 1661. It was recovered from a location in the northern sector off the shore of the Galle harbour. Exterior surface of this bell consists a phrase written in Latin language which reads as “AMOR VINCIT OMANIA ANNO 1625,” which is translated as ‘Love overcomes everything – the year 1625 is of my Lord. (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
An exhibition gallery at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
A ship wreck displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections from ship wrecks displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections from ship wrecks displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
Historic collections of kitchen ware displayed at the the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
An old stair way in the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)
An access way to the Galle Maritime Archaeology Museum (Pic: Harsha Peiris / www.lankachinatoday.com)

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